Friday, May 22, 2015

The Child with Special Health Care Needs and the Well-Child Visit


The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends 13 well-child visits during the first three years of your child’s life. Well-child visits are all about prevention and promotion of healthy habits. Recommended vaccinations are given during these visits, as well as routine screenings for such things as vision or hearing problems, anemia, autism, and other issues. It is the perfect time to share what your child is doing and learning, and to share any questions or concerns you might have. 


If Your Child Has Special Health Care Needs, Does He or She Still Need These Additional Health Care Visits?


Yes! Every child needs well child visits! Even the child with the most severe special health care issues or disabilities still needs good information on healthy eating, oral health care, and safety precautions. The information can be tailored to fit the needs and abilities of the child, but it is still important.

Using the Well Visit Planner for Children with Special Health Care Needs

You can adapt how you use the Planner depending on your child’s special health care needs. For example, your child may have a developmental delay. If so, it may be more helpful to complete the questionnaire about your child’s developmental age, not his or her actual age.

Use the Planner as a tool to help you think through the topics around promoting good health and preventing illness and accidents for your child.

The Well Visit Planner can also give you ideas of questions to ask your child’s specialists or other health care providers.

 Click here to use the Well Visit Planner.


Thursday, May 21, 2015

What is a Well-Child Visit—and Why are They Important?



The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends 13 well-child visits during the first three years of your child’s life. These are over and beyond any visits for illness or those with specialists. That sounds like a lot of visits! Why take your child to the doctor if he or she isn’t sick?
When your child is sick, the most important priority for you and your doctor is figuring out what is wrong and what to do to make it better. There is rarely time to discuss other topics about how your child is growing and developing.

Well-child visits are all about prevention and promotion of healthy habits. Recommended vaccinations are given during these visits, as well as routine screenings for such things as vision or hearing problems, anemia, autism, and other issues. It is the perfect time to share what your child is doing and learning, and to share any questions or concerns you might have.

It’s also a good time for your child’s health care provider to learn about your family and your cultural and family traditions and anything that affects your child’s health and development. They also provide a time for the child to get to know and be more comfortable with the health care provider so that the office is not such a scary place if the child is ill or hurt.

Seven of the 13 visits happen in the first year: newborn, first week, 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 9 months. This is a time when babies are rapidly growing and learning new skills! The visits space out over the next 2 years: 12 months, 15 months, 18 months, 2 years, 2 1/2 years, and 3 years. Beyond 3 years, well-child visits are usually scheduled once a year.


Well-child visits are important for every child—including children and youth with special health care needs. Even the child with the most severe special health issues or disabilities still needs good nutrition, oral care, safety precautions and other health promotion information. 

Public Comment Period for Indiana Medicaid

CMS requires that OMPP make available to the public the 2015 OMPP Quality Strategy Plan. The Quality Strategy Plan outlines Indiana’s goals for improvements in health care and monitoring efforts for continuous quality improvement. The Plan includes the Hoosier Healthwise, HIP, Care Select, and Hoosier Care Connect risk-based managed care programs. Comments on the plan may be made until May 26, 2015. Please send those comments to: HIP2.0@fssa.in.gov.
Additional Documents

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Well Visit Planner

Busy families, busy health care providers! Time is of the essence for everybody, and so making the best use of the time we have is critical. Well-child visits—those regularly scheduled trips to the doctor for your child’s checkups and shots—provide an important time with your child’s health care provider.

The Well-Child Visit
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends 13 well-child visits during the first three years of your child’s life. These are over and beyond any visits for illness or those with specialists. Well-child visits are all about prevention and promotion of healthy habits. Recommended vaccinations are given during these visits, as well as routine screenings for such things as vision or hearing problems, anemia, autism, and other issues. It is the perfect time to share what your child is doing and learning, and to share any questions or concerns you might have.

It’s also a good time for your child’s health care provider to learn about your family and your cultural and family traditions and anything that affects your child’s health and development.


The Well Visit Planner
A new tool can help you make those visits as meaningful as possible: the Well Visit Planner. The Well Visit Planner is an online tool to help families prepare for their children’s upcoming well-child visits to the health care provider.
·         It’s free to use
·         It is available in English and Spanish
·         It takes 10-15 minutes to fill out before each visit
·         It can be printed and taken to a visit to help your and your child’s doctor discuss your child.
·         It helps families be better partners in their child’s health care, and helps health care providers better serve the needs of the child and the family.


To use the Well Visit Planner, go to: www.WellVisitPlanner.org .

Monday, May 18, 2015

First Steps Early Intervention Public Comment Period

Family Voices shares the following opportunity for families to share their voice:

The state of Indiana is accepting public comment on the Part C State Plan and Attachments for the First Steps Early Intervention System. 

The plan is on file with the Bureau of Child Development Services, 402 West Washington Street, MS 51, Indianapolis, IN 46204 and is available online at http://www.in.gov/fssa/ddrs/2812.htm. Copies of the application are also available for review at First Steps Councils and System Point of Entry offices throughout the state. Interested persons and organizations may request copies of the application by calling 1-877-511-1144 or e-mailing firststepsweb@fssa.in.gov.

Interested persons and organizations may also submit written comments for state review by close of business on June 30, 2015. Written comments should include the name, title, and address of the commentator; the specific part of the proposed rule on which comments are being made; and the specific recommended actions to be taken. Written comments should be directed to: First Steps Early Intervention System, Attn: FS Application, Bureau of Child Development Services, 402 W. Washington St., MS51, Indianapolis, IN 46204; or comments can be e-mailed to firststepsweb@fssa.in.gov.

Public hearings to take comment will also be held on:

June 10, 201510:00 – 12:00 Noon - Indiana Government Center South, 402 W. Washington Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204, in Conference Room 14.

June 12, 20158:00 – 10:00 a.m. - Indiana Institute on Disability and Community, Indiana University, 1905 North Range Road, Bloomington, IN, 47408, Conference Room B.  If attending, please visit the administration office to sign-in and obtain a parking permit.

Any requests for accommodations should be made at least one week in advance by e-mailing First Steps staff at firststepsweb@fssa.in.gov.

Friday, May 15, 2015

Regional Meetings about Human Services

Register for Regional meetings - Join the discussion
Indiana Association of United Ways
 and Indiana Coalition for Human Services
are planning regional meetings with human services providers. In these sessions, we will 
  1. provide updates and Q&A about the Statehouse, including how the budget and certain policies affect human services; 
  2. discuss important issues on the horizon for human services, including philosophical debates about welfare reform, drug testing, best practice responses on the HIV crisis; and 
  3. provide information about and opportunities to get involved.
Our schedule includes:
  • May 19 - New Albany at YMCA of Southern Indiana, 8-10amET - NOTE POSTPONED, with rescheduled date to be announced
  • May 27 - Evansville at United Way, 8-10amCT 
  • May 27 - Terre Haute at YMCA, 1-3pmET 
  • May 28 - Ft. Wayne at Brightpoint (formerly known as CANI), 11:30am-1:30pmET
  • June 3 -  Merrillville (Lake County) at Centier Bank, 8-10amCT
  • June 3 - Valparaiso at United Way, 1-3pmCT 
  • June 4 - South Bend at Logan Center, 9:30-11:30amET
  • June 10 - Lafayette at Lafayette Urban Ministry,11am-1:30pmET
Register here to attend. See one-page overview with details. If you would like a session in your community, contact us

Monday, May 11, 2015

Family Voices Indiana Awarded Grant to Continue as the Family to Family Health Information Center


Family Voices Indiana is pleased to announce that we have been awarded a grant to continue as the Family to Family Health Information Center for Indiana. The grant is administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs. 
Family-to-Family Health Information Centers (F2F HICs) are family-staffed organizations that assist families of children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and the professionals who serve them. F2F HICs provide support, information, resources, and training around health issues.
F2F HICs are uniquely able to help families because they are staffed by family members who have first-hand experience navigating the maze of health care services and programs for CYSHCN.  This intimate understanding of the issues that families face make F2F staff exceptionally qualified to help families navigate health systems and make informed decisions. Some F2F HICs are independent nonprofits; others are part of collaborative nonprofit organizations or state agencies. All F2F HICs have a strong commitment to and expertise about CYSHCN.

Do you have a child with special health care needs and/or a disability?  Do you support or teach a child with exceptional needs?

DO YOU NEED HELP WITH:
FIRST STEPS? SPECIAL EDUCATION?  MEDICAID? MEDICAID WAIVERS?  RESPITE? HEALTH CARE FUNDING?  HEALTH CARE SERVICES?

Family Voices Indiana is staffed by trained family leaders who have children with special health care needs and expertise in these programs.
We're here to help!

CALL US AT 317.944.8982

EMAIL US AT INFO@FVINDIANA.ORG