Monday, May 6, 2013

Impact of sequestration


Automatic cuts known as the “sequester” continue to take effect. Members of Congress want to know how these cuts have affected their state and districts. Share your story with your representative so they hear the family voice.
Call your Members of Congress at 202-224-3121 and ask to be connected to your Representatives and Senators. Or use this tool to identify them and/or contact them: http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml
If your family is struggling, contact us for resources for your child with special health care needs: 317 944 8982 info@fvindiana.org
Impacts on Indiana
According to the White House, the following are some of the effects the Sequester will have in Indiana:

·         Teachers and Schools: Indiana will lose approximately $13.8 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 190 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition about 12,000 fewer students would be served and approximately 50 fewer schools would receive funding.
o    Education for Children with Disabilities: In addition, Indiana will lose approximately $12.4 million in funds for about 150 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.
 
·         Military Readiness: In Indiana, approximately 11,000 civilian Department of Defense employees
would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $64.4 million in total.
o    Army: Base operation funding would be cut by about $1.7 million in Indiana.
o    Air Force: Funding for Air Force operations in Indiana would be cut by about $7 million.
o    Navy: Scheduled Blue Angels shows in Indianapolis and Evansville could be canceled.
 
·         Law Enforcement and Public Safety Funds for Crime Prevention and Prosecution: Indiana will lose about $262,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.
 
·         Job Search Assistance to Help those in Indiana find Employment and Training: Indiana will lose about $683,000 in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 24,290 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.
 
·         Child Care: Up to 600 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care, which is also essential for working parents to hold down a job.
 
·         Vaccines for Children: In Indiana around 2,770 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of about $189,000.
 
·         Public Health: Indiana will lose approximately $619,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. In addition, Indiana will lose about $1.7 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 1,100 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Indiana State Department of Health will lose about $146,000 resulting in around 3,700 fewer HIV tests.
 
·         STOP Violence Against Women Program: Indiana could lose up to $138,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 500 fewer victims being served.
 
·         Nutrition Assistance for Seniors: Indiana would lose approximately $820,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

For more information on the automatic cuts see these resources:
·         Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:  Congress Addresses Flight Delays But Leaves Other Sequestration Problems Unsolved by Sharon Parrott, April 26, 2013
·         Coalition on Human Needs:  Sequester Impact: Weekly Summaries  (collected since March 5)
·         Center on Budget and Policy Priorities: Sequestration by the Numbers by Richard Kogan, March 22, 2013
·         Center on Budget and Policy Priorities: How the Across-the-Board Cuts in the Budget Control Act Will Work by Richard Kogan, April 27, 2013

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